How to File a Workers’ Compensation Claim

New Jersey Lawyer Now Blog

Archive for April, 2012

How to File a Workers’ Compensation Claim

Have you been hurt at work? Want to learn more about filing a Workers’ Compensation claim? Please contact Corey P. Morano, Esq. at 201-598-5019 for a free consultation. I work on a contingency basis on any and all Workers’ Compensation lawsuits.

The injured worker has the option of filing a formal claim petition with the Division, within the statutory time period which is generally 2 years. The first hearing before a judge of compensation is typically held within six months from the date of filing. Cases are usually assigned to a district office by either the county of residence of the injured worker, or if the worker lives out of state, the county where the employer is located.

 

The vast majority of claim petitions are settled by mutual agreement as to the amount of benefits due and extent of disability. If the issues cannot be resolved during the pretrial stage, trial commences with the taking of testimony of the injured worker, medical and lay witnesses. At the conclusion of trial, the judge renders a decision based upon the relevant evidence surrounding the case. Their rulings are binding and are appealable only to the Appellate Division of the Superior Court.

 

Motions for Medical and/or Temporary Benefits:

The law also provides immediate recourse to the worker in need of prompt medical treatment and temporary benefits. In such instances, the worker may choose to file a “Motion for Medical and Temporary Benefits” which is assigned an initial hearing date before a Judge of Compensation within 30 days of filing. More information on all of this is available on the Department of Labor’s website.

Have you been hurt at work? Want to learn more about filing a Workers’ Compensation claim? Please contact Corey P. Morano, Esq. at 201-598-5019 for a free consultation. I work on a contingency basis on any and all Workers’ Compensation lawsuits.

New Jersey Statute of Limitations Laws for Filing Claims

The easiest way to get tripped up in filing a  New Jersey lawsuit is to blow the statute of limitations. Below is a brief summary of the statute of limitations on many of New Jersey most frequently filed claims of action. The clock is always ticking on your potential lawsuit and the laws are change everyday. Therefore, the following list may be a good point of reference but to get a definitive answer to your statute of limitations questions you must contact a lawyer immediately. To learn more about your potential case and for a free consultation please call Corey P. Morano, Esq at 201-598-5019 today!

ACCOUNT STATED – 6 YEARS (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2A:14-1 2011)

ANTITRUST – 4 YEARS (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 56:9-14 (2011))

BREACH OF CONTRACT

  • 6 YEARS for non-sales contracts (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2A:14-1 (2011)); and
  • 4 YEARS for contracts for the sale of goods under the Uniform Commercial Code (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 12A:2-725 (2011)).

 

BREACH OF FIDUCIARY DUTY

  • 6 YEARS for a breach of fiduciary duty causing purely economic loss and is controlled by the substantive law governing the relationship (Balliet v. Fennell, 845 A.2d 168, 170, 172 (N.J. Super. Ct. App. Div. 2004))
  • 2 YEARS for a breach of fiduciary duty harming one’s physical or emotional well-being (Balliet, at 171).

BREACH OF WARRANTY – 4 YEARS (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 12A:2-725 (2011)).

 

CONSUMER PROTECTION STATUTES

  • 6 YEARS for claims under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act (Kennedy v. Axa Equitable Life Ins., Co., 2007 WL 2688881, at *2 (D.N.J. Sep. 11, 2007)).

 

CONVERSION

  • 6 YEARS for claims involving conversion of chattel (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 12A:14-1 (2011)
  • 3 YEARS for a claim involving conversion of a negotiable instrument (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 12A:3-118(g)

EMPLOYMENT (WHISTLEBLOWER) – 1 YEAR for claims filed under the Conscientious Employee Protection Act (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 34:19-5 (2011));

EMPLOYMENT (Discrimination)

  • 180 Days for claims filed under the Law Against Discrimination (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 10:5-18 (2011))
  • 2YEARS for civil cases filed in the Superior Court (Montells v. Haynes, 627 A.2d 654, 655 (N.J. 1993))

EMPLOYMENT (Workers’ Compenstion) – 2 YEARS petitions filed under the Worker’s Compensation Act (N.J. Stat. Ann. §§ 34:15-41 (2011) and 34:15-51 (2011)).

ENFORCEMENT OF JUDGMENTS

  • 20 YEARS for New Jersey judgments (N.J.Stat. Ann. § 2A:14-5 (2011)
  • For foreign judgments, the statute of limitations is the shorter of 20 years or the length of time to enforce the judgment in the foreign jurisdiction (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2A:14-5 (2011)).
  • 20 YEARS for an execution concerning real estate, goods and chattel (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2A:17-3 (2011)).

FRAUD – 6 YEARS(N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2A:14-1 (2011)).

NEGLIGENCE

  • 2 years for personal injury claims (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2A:14-2 (2011))
  • 6 YEARS for property claims (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2A:14-1 (2011)).

TRADE SECRET MISAPPROPRIATION – 6 YEARS (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2A:14-1 (2011)).

UNFAIR COMPETITION – 6 YEARS for unfair competition claims under the common law and section 56:4-1 of New Jersey’s unfair competition statute

UNJUST ENRICHMENT – 6 YEARS (Jacobson v. Celgene Corp., 2010 WL 1492869, at *3 (D.N.J. Apr. 14, 2010)).

WRONGFUL DEATH AND SURVIVAL

  • 2 YEARS for wrongful death claims (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2A:31-3 (2011)
  • New Jersey has no statute of limitations for a wrongful death action, if the death resulted from murder, aggravated manslaughter or manslaughter for which the defendant has been convicted, found not guilty by reason of insanity or adjudicated delinquent (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2A:31-3 (2011)).
  • The statute of limitations is two years for survival actions (Thomas v. Correctional Med. Servs., Inc., 2009 WL 737105, at *3 (D.N.J. Mar. 17, 2009)).

The easiest way to get tripped up in filing a lawsuit is to blow the statute of limitations. Below is a brief summary of the statute of limitations on many of New Jersey most frequently filed claims of action. To learn more about your potential case and for a free consultation please call Corey P. Morano, Esq at 201-598-5019 today!